Irrigation Leader
  • Flipbook

    Volume 10 Issue 6 July 2019 Financing Irrigation Infrastructure

    Water infrastructure projects generally involve huge amounts of concrete, miles of canal lining or pipe, or large capital installations. As a result, it is no surprise that they cost large sums of money and are often difficult to plan and pay for. In this issue of Irrigation Leader, we bring you conversations with an irrigation district, a grant-making institution, a grant consultant, an attorney, and a manufacturer that look at funding water infrastructure from every angle. Our cover interview is with Matt Lukasiewicz of the Loup Basin Reclamation District. Loup Basin, which manages two subordinate irrigation districts, bought the title for its infrastructure from the Bureau of Reclamation in 2002.…

  • Flipbook

    Volume 10 Issue 5 May/June 2019 Public Outreach for Irrigation Districts

    Public outreach is a must for irrigation districts. By getting to know ratepayers and community members, educating them, and solving their problems, an irrigation district can save time and money, gain goodwill, and even find new employees. In this month’s Irrigation Leader, we talk with managers, public relations staff, scientists, and communications professionals about how districts can boost their public outreach efforts. In our cover story, we interview Shane Leonard, Simon Wallace, and Allison Brague of Arizona’s Roosevelt Water Conservation District. By hiring Mr. Wallace and Ms. Brague to create his customer service department, Mr. Leonard was able to better address customer concerns— but perhaps more surprisingly, he saved money.…

  • Flipbook,  Washington State

    Volume 10 Issue 4 April Washington Edition 2019 David Brown: Drought-Resistant Water Supplies for Yakima

    D avid Brown of the City of Yakima’s Water/Irrigation Division knows that straightforward improvements can have dramatic results. In 1998, the city replaced 32 miles of wood-stave pipes with PVC and polyethylene and, in so doing, reduced its diversion from 23 cubic feet per second to 9. Today, the division is taking the same attitude toward implementing aquifer storage and recovery facilities and replacing the 1985 Nelson Dam with a roughened channel. As Mr. Brown explains in our cover story, these improvements require money, but their payoffs are significant. The rest of this issue focuses on an Irrigation Leader tour of Chile that took place in February. Chile stretches 2,600…

  • Flipbook

    Volume 10 Issue 4 April 2019 IRRIGATION LEADER TOURS CHILE

    C hile is a country of 18 million people, stretching 2,600 miles north-to-south along the Pacific Coast of South America. Its dramatic landscape includes mountains, deserts, fjords, and fertile valleys. In February, I led an Irrigation Leader tour to this amazing country. We saw how farmers, water managers, and civil servants are working to fight Chile’s serious droughts and cultivate grapes, avocados, citrus fruits, vegetables, and other crops in north-central Chile’s transverse valleys. In these pages, you will read our participants’ reactions to the tour and see where they went. Rubicon—an Australian company that American irrigators know well—has opened its own Santiago office. We speak with Gastón Sagredo about how…

  • Flipbook,  Washington State

    Volume 10 Issue 3 March Washington Edition 2019 LORI BRADY SUNNYSIDE VALLEY IRRIGATION DISTRICT’S COMMITMENT TO WATER CONSERVATION

    T he readers of Irrigation Leader know that our field is always advancing—whether because of decades-long conservation and infrastructure projects or because of technological leaps that improve the equipment in the field. In our cover story this month, we talk with Lori Brady, the manager of Sunnyside Valley Irrigation District, which has embarked on an ambitious, 40-year project to enhance its infrastructure and make it more efficient. A more efficient delivery system means that individual farmers can also use water more efficiently. Ms. Brady tells us about how her district’s new automated check structures and the enclosed laterals it is currently installing serve both environmental and economic ends. We also…

  • Screenshot of flipbook PDF reader for Irrigation Leader March 2019. Volume 10 Issue 3.
    Flipbook

    Volume 10 Issue 3 March 2019 Advances in Center-Pivot Technology

    W hen I told a friend that the newest issue of Irrigation Leader was about new advances in center-pivot technology, he said with a smile, “Are there any of those?” To answer in a word: Yes! From the development of new monitoring and man . The novel application of well-known technologies; the invention of brand-new computer systems; and the development of new, more reliable machines are all changing irrigated agriculture for the better. Advances in center-pivot technology are all around us. We hope that this issue of Irrigation Leader introduces you to a couple of them. Kris Polly is editor-in-chief of Irrigation Leader magazine and president of Water Strategies LLC,…

  • Screenshot of flipbook reader for Irrigation Leader Washington State February 2019
    Flipbook,  Washington State

    Volume 10 Issue 2 February Washington Edition 2019 Leading Cooperation in the Yakima Basin

    Phil Rigdon is the superintendent of the Yakama Nation’s Department of Natural Resources, which employs over 500 people and works on fisheries, water, forestry, and environmental protection. Under Mr. Rigdon’s direction, the department has been undertaking tributary supplement and aquifer recharge projects in the Yakima basin in order to serve the Nation’s out-of-stream needs, benefit agriculture, and restore native salmon to vast areas of Washington State. Mr. Rigdon has also been pivotal in cooperating with neighboring irrigation districts to pursue shared goals. We discuss all this and more in this month’s Irrigation Leader cover story. In this month’s issue, we also speak with a number of executives, professionals, inventors, and…

  • Screenshot of flipbook reader for Irrigation Leader February 2019
    Flipbook

    Volume 10 Issue 2 February 2019 Infrastructure Challenges

    Irrigators are in the business of moving vast quantities of vitally important water—a task that requires solid, reliable, and durable infrastructure. That is easy to say, but as any canal manager knows, keeping irrigation infrastructure in pristine shape can be an arduous task. In this month’s issue of Irrigation Leader, we speak with the executives, professionals, inventors, and implementers who are working to meet our nation’s infrastructure challenges. Friant Water Authority delivers over a million acre-feet of surface water annually to water users in the Central Valley of California. Friant is facing a major issue of ground subsidence, which is reducing the capacity of its 152-mile Friant-Kern Canal. In our…

  • Flipbook,  Washington State

    Volume 10 Issue 1 January Washington Edition 2019 Training The Next Generation of Water Leaders

    Everyone reading this magazine knows irrigation-district managers and irrigated-crop farmers with decades of experience and hard-won knowledge. It is precisely this kind of broad, deep expertise that we want to instill in the irrigation leaders of tomorrow. But in an era when technology is advancing at a rapid pace and the economy is ever more integrated on a national and global level, there is much to learn. Young irrigation professionals today need to understand policymaking on the local, state, and national level; international trade and markets; and the newest computer technologies. All this explains why irrigation leadership and training programs are becoming more and more important. In this issue of…

  • Flipbook

    Volume 10 Issue 1 January 2019 Training The Next Generation of Water Leaders

    Everyone reading this magazine knows irrigation district managers and irrigated-crop farmers with decades of experience and hard-won knowledge. It is precisely this kind of broad, deep expertise that we want to instill in the irrigation leaders of tomorrow. But in an era when technology is advancing at a rapid pace and the economy is ever more integrated on a national and global level, there is much to learn. Young irrigation professionals today need to understand policymaking on the local, state, and national level; international trade and markets; and the newest information technologies. All this explains why irrigation leadership and training programs are becoming more and more important. In this issue…