Irrigation Leader
  • Flipbook,  Washington State

    Volume 10 Issue 8 August Washington Edition 2019 Growing Washington’s Economy: PChris Voigt of the Washington State Potato Commission

    The cultivation of potatoes—one of Washington State’s top crops, supporting 36,000 jobs in the state—is directly dependent on irrigation infrastructure and technology. Columbia River water has turned the desert landscape of central Washington into a bounteous agricultural region. In this month’s cover story, Chris Voigt, the director of the Washington State Potato Commission, tells us about how potatowes are grown, irrigated, harvested, and processed in Washington State. Much of the rest of our September issue focuses on New Mexico, home to some of the nation’s oldest Reclamation infrastructure. In our cover story, Dale Ballard tells us about historic Carlsbad Irrigation District (CID), of which he is manager. CID was founded in…

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    Volume 10 Issue 8 September 2019 Irrigation in the Land of Enchantment

    New Mexico has some of the nation’s oldest Reclamation infrastructure. Today, it has some of the nation’s most sophisticated groundwater monitoring activity. Its arid landscape is also an ideal location to grow pecans, cotton, and alfalfa. This month’sIrrigation Leader looks at the state’s irrigated agriculture from a number of perspectives. In our cover story, Dale Ballard tells us about historic Carlsbad Irrigation District (CID), of which he is manager. CID was founded in the first years of the 20th century by early New Mexico pioneers. Today, much of its infrastructure is over a century old. CID is fighting to maintain its infrastructure, supply its farmers, and meet interstate water delivery requirements.…

  • Flipbook,  Washington State

    Volume 10 Issue 7 August Washington Edition 2019 Tackling Wapato Irrigation Project’s Challenges: Stuart Crane of the Yakama Nation

    For a century, the Wapato Irrigation District (WIP) has been delivering water to the diverse and productive agriculture of Washington’s Yakama Nation reservation. While some of WIP’s engineering and operating activities are handled by the Yakama Nation, it is a federally owned project operated primarily by the Bureau of Indian Affairs. In our cover interview, Stuart Crane of the Yakama Nation Water Resource Program discusses the challenges this entails and describes the infrastructure projects WIP is currently undertaking. I also speak with Dr. David DeJong, the director of the Pima-Maricopa Irrigation Project (P-MIP), the tribal program that is managing the design and construction of over 100 miles of irrigation conveyance structures in…

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    Volume 10 Issue 7 August 2019 Nation-Building Through Irrigation Infrastructure

    Arizona agriculture is a marvel. Despite its blazing hot summers and its desert climate, the state produces significant agricultural output, including most of the lettuce, cauliflower, and broccoli eaten in the United States and Canada during the winter. To make this happen, water suppliers and irrigators distribute hundreds of thousands of acre-feet of water each year across the state. In our cover story, I speak with Dr. David DeJong, the director of the Pima-Maricopa Irrigation Project (P-MIP), the tribal program that is managing the design and construction of over 100 miles of irrigation conveyance structures in the Gila River Indian Community. Dr. Dejong, whose doctoral dissertation in history focused on the water rights…

  • Flipbook,  Washington State

    Volume 10 Issue 6 July Washington Edition 2019 Senator Jim Honeyford: Water Leadership for Washington

    Irrigation Leader’s cover story this month features Washington State Senator Jim Honeyford, who has long championed water management and infrastructure bills that benefit irrigation districts and water users across his state. Senator Honeyford tells us about the legislation he has supported in the past and his priorities for the future and gives his advice to any irrigation district that wants to make its voice heard in the state legislature. We also focus on the challenges of funding water infrastructure projects, starting with an interview with Matt Lukasiewicz of the Loup Basin Reclamation District. Loup Basin, which manages two subordinate irrigation districts, bought the title for its infrastructure from the Bureau…

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    Volume 10 Issue 6 July 2019 Financing Irrigation Infrastructure

    Water infrastructure projects generally involve huge amounts of concrete, miles of canal lining or pipe, or large capital installations. As a result, it is no surprise that they cost large sums of money and are often difficult to plan and pay for. In this issue of Irrigation Leader, we bring you conversations with an irrigation district, a grant-making institution, a grant consultant, an attorney, and a manufacturer that look at funding water infrastructure from every angle. Our cover interview is with Matt Lukasiewicz of the Loup Basin Reclamation District. Loup Basin, which manages two subordinate irrigation districts, bought the title for its infrastructure from the Bureau of Reclamation in 2002.…

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    Volume 10 Issue 5 May/June 2019 Public Outreach for Irrigation Districts

    Public outreach is a must for irrigation districts. By getting to know ratepayers and community members, educating them, and solving their problems, an irrigation district can save time and money, gain goodwill, and even find new employees. In this month’s Irrigation Leader, we talk with managers, public relations staff, scientists, and communications professionals about how districts can boost their public outreach efforts. In our cover story, we interview Shane Leonard, Simon Wallace, and Allison Brague of Arizona’s Roosevelt Water Conservation District. By hiring Mr. Wallace and Ms. Brague to create his customer service department, Mr. Leonard was able to better address customer concerns— but perhaps more surprisingly, he saved money.…

  • Flipbook,  Washington State

    Volume 10 Issue 4 April Washington Edition 2019 David Brown: Drought-Resistant Water Supplies for Yakima

    D avid Brown of the City of Yakima’s Water/Irrigation Division knows that straightforward improvements can have dramatic results. In 1998, the city replaced 32 miles of wood-stave pipes with PVC and polyethylene and, in so doing, reduced its diversion from 23 cubic feet per second to 9. Today, the division is taking the same attitude toward implementing aquifer storage and recovery facilities and replacing the 1985 Nelson Dam with a roughened channel. As Mr. Brown explains in our cover story, these improvements require money, but their payoffs are significant. The rest of this issue focuses on an Irrigation Leader tour of Chile that took place in February. Chile stretches 2,600…

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    Volume 10 Issue 4 April 2019 IRRIGATION LEADER TOURS CHILE

    C hile is a country of 18 million people, stretching 2,600 miles north-to-south along the Pacific Coast of South America. Its dramatic landscape includes mountains, deserts, fjords, and fertile valleys. In February, I led an Irrigation Leader tour to this amazing country. We saw how farmers, water managers, and civil servants are working to fight Chile’s serious droughts and cultivate grapes, avocados, citrus fruits, vegetables, and other crops in north-central Chile’s transverse valleys. In these pages, you will read our participants’ reactions to the tour and see where they went. Rubicon—an Australian company that American irrigators know well—has opened its own Santiago office. We speak with Gastón Sagredo about how…

  • Flipbook,  Washington State

    Volume 10 Issue 3 March Washington Edition 2019 LORI BRADY SUNNYSIDE VALLEY IRRIGATION DISTRICT’S COMMITMENT TO WATER CONSERVATION

    T he readers of Irrigation Leader know that our field is always advancing—whether because of decades-long conservation and infrastructure projects or because of technological leaps that improve the equipment in the field. In our cover story this month, we talk with Lori Brady, the manager of Sunnyside Valley Irrigation District, which has embarked on an ambitious, 40-year project to enhance its infrastructure and make it more efficient. A more efficient delivery system means that individual farmers can also use water more efficiently. Ms. Brady tells us about how her district’s new automated check structures and the enclosed laterals it is currently installing serve both environmental and economic ends. We also…