Irrigation Leader
  • Flipbook

    Volume 12 Issue 5 May Arizona Edition Chairwoman Amelia Flores of the Colorado River Indian Tribes

    By Kris Polly Amelia Flores is a longtime councilmember and public servant of the Colorado River Indian Tribes (CRIT), and in 2020, she became the first woman to be elected chair of CRIT’s Tribal Council. In our cover story, Chairwoman Flores tells us about her responsibilities as chairwoman, CRIT’s irrigation infrastructure, and its recent proposal for federal legislation to allow it to lease its Colorado River water off its reservation.  In this month’s Irrigation Leader, we also bring you the fascinating stories of our country’s small irrigation districts. Two of those districts are in Texas: Meredith Allen and Caroline Runge, the current and outgoing managers of Texas’s Menard County Water…

  • Flipbook

    Volume 12 Issue 5 May Menard County Water Control and Improvement District No. 1: Revitalizing a 280-Year-Old Canal

    By Kris Polly The beauty of American agriculture lies not just in its epic magnitude and immense productivity, but in the fact that it so often has a local and small-scale character. Small and family farms are integral to U.S. agriculture; so too are small local irrigation districts and water companies. In this month’s Irrigation Leader, we bring you some of their stories.  In our cover story, we interview Meredith Allen and Caroline Runge, the current and outgoing managers of Texas’s Menard County Water Control and Improvement District No. 1, which is working to repair its historic irrigation canal, built by the Spanish in 1756, and to revitalize irrigated agriculture…

  • Flipbook

    Volume 12 Issue 5 May Washington State Edition An Attorney Who Knows Ag From the Inside

    By Kris Polly  Toni Meacham is a highly respected ag and water attorney in central Washington State. She is also an active, fifth-generation rancher. Her personal and family background as well as her legal training gives her and insider’s knowledge of ag and water law, making her a highly effective advocate for Washington agriculture.  In this month’s Irrigation Leader, we also bring you the fascinating stories of our country’s small irrigation districts. Two of those districts are in Texas: Meredith Allen and Caroline Runge, the current and outgoing managers of Texas’s Menard County Water Control and Improvement District No. 1, are working to repair the district’s historic irrigation canal, built…

  • Featured,  Interview

    Toni Meacham: Wrangling Water Law in Washington

    Toni Meacham grew up understanding the importance of water for agriculture and from an early age wanted to advocate for those who depend on it. Working in her own law practice as well as with the Washington Agricultural Legal Foundation (WALF) has allowed her to do precisely that. Ms. Meacham’s experiences as both an attorney and a rancher enable her to understand the needs, interests, and viewpoints of a wide variety of stakeholders on water law issues. In this interview, Ms. Meacham tells Irrigation Leader about how she became interested in water and agricultural law, the unique challenges of those issues, and the importance of effective representation for farmers, ranchers,…

  • Featured,  Interview

    Dee Waldron: Leveling Out for Irrigation in Utah’s Weber Basin

    The narrative of a small family farmer prospering after many years of hard work and sacrifice is an iconic version of the American dream. Achieving this dream requires a farmer to overcome many obstacles, both natural and manmade. Dee Waldron is someone who has lived that dream, growing up on a family farm, striving to acquire the land and water needed to grow his business, and now owning a successful agricultural enterprise for beef, barley, and other crops. In this interview, Mr. Waldron tells Irrigation Leader how he began his journey, how he has used innovative irrigation strategies to ensure proper water for his crops and cattle, and the importance…

  • Featured,  Interview

    The Keith–Lincoln County Irrigation District: A Historic Small District in Western Nebraska

    The Keith–Lincoln County Irrigation District (KLCID), located in western Nebraska, has been operating since the late 19th century. Aside from a headgate system installed during the 1970s, the canal system used by the KLCID today also dates back to that time. In this interview, we speak with KLCID Board President Mark McConnell about the district’s operations and the challenges of a small irrigation district.

  • Featured,  Interview

    Yuma Irrigation District: Enabling All-Year-Round Ag in the Arid Southwest

    Agricultural producers in the Yuma, Arizona, area produce around 90 percent of North America’s winter produce. In the summer, they produce significant amounts of field crops as well. Yuma Irrigation District (YID), irrigating 10,600 acres, is one of the smaller local irrigation districts that make this possible. In this interview, YID General Manager Rex Green tells Irrigation Leader about the district’s operations and top issues. 

  • Featured,  Interview

    Supplying Agricultural Water in Hidalgo County, Texas

    The Hidalgo County Water Control and Improvement District #19 (HCWCID19) is a small water supplier located near the Rio Grande. In this interview, General Manager Oscar Gonzalez tells Irrigation Leader about its operations, the challenges of dealing with encroaching development, and the complications caused by the construction of the wall on the U.S.-Mexico border.

  • Featured,  Interview

    Menard County Water Control and Improvement District No. 1: Revitalizing a 280‑Year-Old Canal

    Menard County Water Control and Improvement District No. 1 (MCWCID), located in Menard County, Texas, manages an irrigation canal that was built by the Spanish in 1756. After being temporarily dewatered in 2013, the canal has experienced major seepage issues and now requires repairs. In this interview, Meredith Allen and Caroline Runge, the current and outgoing managers of MCWCID, talk to Irrigation Leader about the fascinating history of their canal and their plans to repair it and revitalize irrigated agriculture in Menard County.

  • Arizona Edition,  Featured,  Interview

    Chairwoman Amelia Flores: Advancing Irrigation and Infrastructure for the Colorado River Indian Tribes

    Amelia Flores is the newly elected chairwoman of the Colorado River Indian Tribes (CRIT), whose reservation stretches along the border of Arizona and California. In this interview, Chairwoman Flores tells us about her responsibilities as chairwoman, CRIT’s irrigation infrastructure, and its recent proposal for federal legislation to allow it to lease its Colorado River water off its reservation.