Irrigation Leader
  • Flipbook,  Montana State

    Volume 13 Issue 5 May Montana State

    By Kris Polly I am pleased this month to introduce our new Montana edition of Irrigation Leader, and there is no better way to do it than with our cover interview with Governor Greg Gianforte, conducted by Contributing Editor Mike Murphy. Governor Gianforte is a champion for Montana agriculture, and in this fascinating interview, he discusses infrastructure needs, drought, the prospects for new irrigation districts, and more.  We also learn about several new developments in horticulture. First, we speak with Mathias Levarek, the CEO of Agrotonomy, which manufactures aeroponic tower farms that drizzle plant roots with nutrients and water. Next, we speak with Dr. Trentee Bush, Jill Heemstra, and Richard…

  • Flipbook,  Washington State

    Volume 13 Issue 5 May Washington State Edition

    By Kris Polly For this month’s cover story, we speak with Norman Semanko, who brings more than 30 years of experience with water resources and regulatory issues to his work as the water law practice group leader in the Pacific Northwest Region for Parsons Behle & Latimer. He tells us about his work and the trends affecting irrigated agriculture, irrigation districts, and canal companies today.  We also learn about several new developments in horticulture. First, we speak with Mathias Levarek, the CEO of Agrotonomy, which manufactures aeroponic tower farms that drizzle plant roots with nutrients and water. Next, we speak with Dr. Trentee Bush, Jill Heemstra, and Richard M. Wright…

  • Flipbook

    Volume 13 Issue 5 May

    By Kris Polly The idea of irrigated agriculture conjures up images of expansive fields and center-pivot irrigators, but irrigated ag goes far beyond that. In this issue, we learn about several unconventional irrigated horticultural methods.  First, we speak with Mathias Levarek, the CEO of Agrotonomy, which manufactures aeroponic tower farms that drizzle plant roots with nutrients and water. Suitable for roofs, greenhouses, or the outdoors, Agrotonomy’s towers hold great potential.  Next, we speak with Dr. Trentee Bush, Jill Heemstra, and Richard M. Wright of Northeast Community College about its Horticulture and Golf Course Management program, which includes significant in-field learning opportunities.  Then, we talk to John Scholten, a product specialist…

  • Featured,  Interview

    Mike Wells Scotia, NE

    General Manager | Twin Loups Irrigation District and Twin Loups Reclamation District  Years working in irrigation: 39  Years as a manager: 7  Number of employees: 13 full time; 2 summer part time  Size of service area in acres: 56,199  Amount of water diverted for irrigation per year in acre-feet: 50,000–55,000 in an average rainfall year  Main crops irrigated: Alfalfa, corn, soybeans  Predominant irrigation methods: Center pivot, gravity 

  • Featured,  Interview

    Gabriel Varela Cano La Serena, Chile

    President | Miraflores Canal and Elqui River Joint Board of Control  Years working in irrigation: 20  Years as manager: 14  Number of employees: 21  Size of service area in acres: 29,650, plus the supply of half the drinking water for a municipal system serving 600,000 people  Amount of water diverted for irrigation per year in acre-feet: 105,390–194,570, plus 16,214 acre-feet for municipal use  Main crops irrigated: Citrus fruit, grapes, vegetables  Predominant irrigation methods: Drip, drip tape 

  • Featured,  Interview

    Juan Valero de Palma Valencia, Spain

    General Secretary | Royal Canal of the Júcar  Years working in irrigation: 34  Years as manager: 33  Number of employees: 161 (including the governing board and local boards)  Size of service area in acres: 50,290  Amount of water diverted for irrigation per year in acre-feet: 132,050  Main crops irrigated: Citrus fruit, persimmons, rice, vegetables  Predominant irrigation methods: Drip, flood 

  • Featured,  Interview

    Marc Thalacker Sisters, OR

    Manager |Three Sisters Irrigation District Years working in irrigation: 25  Years as manager: 25  Number of employees: 7  Size of service area in acres: 60,000, 7,600 of which is irrigated  Amount of water diverted for irrigation per year in acre-feet: 20,000–27,000  Main crops irrigated: Alfalfa, grass, grains, hemp, seed crops  Predominant irrigation methods: Pivot, realign, microsprinklers, drip (for hemp) 

  • Flipbook

    Volume 13 Issue 4 April

    By Kris Polly The success and flourishing of an irrigation district depend on many things—weather, funding, upkeep, modernization, and planning, for instance—but perhaps no factor counts as much as does a good manager. A manager must know their district’s distinctive characteristics and challenges, their employees, and their board. And they must have a clear vision of the future and what it will take to bring their district success.  This month, we bring you our first Managers Issue since January 2020. In this issue, we interview 21 managers, hailing from across the western United States and even across the world, about their top issues, their training and safety programs, the lessons…

  • Featured,  Interview

    Rick Smith Sunset, UT

    General Manager |Davis and Weber Counties Canal Company and the Weber River Water Users Association  Years working in irrigation: 23  Years as manager: 6  Number of employees: 13  Size of service area in acres: 30,000  Amount of water diverted for irrigation per year in acre-feet: 60,000–80,000  Main crops irrigated: Beans, corn, grains, melons, onions, peppers  Predominant irrigation methods: Flood (agriculture), sprinklers (secondary water/lawn and garden) 

  • Featured,  Interview

    Amadeu Ros Farré Mollerussa, Catalonia, Spain

    President | General Community of Irrigators of the Canals of Urgell Years working in irrigation: 40  Years as manager: 15  Number of employees: 61  Size of service area in acres: 185,330  Amount of water diverted for irrigation per year in acre-feet: 486,430  Main crops irrigated: Alfalfa, maize, tree fruit (primarily apples and pears), winter cereals (wheat and barley)  Predominant irrigation methods: Flood (88%), spray (6%), drip (6%)