Irrigation Leader
  • Arizona Edition,  Flipbook

    Volume 13 Issue 4 April Arizona Edition

    By Kris Polly The success and flourishing of an irrigation district depend on many things—weather, funding, upkeep, modernization, and planning, for instance—but perhaps no factor counts as much as does a good manager. A manager must know their district’s distinctive characteristics and challenges, their employees, and their board. And they must have a clear vision of the future and what it will take to bring their district success.  This month, we bring you our first Managers Issue since January 2020. In this issue, we interview 21 managers, hailing from across the western United States and even across the world, about their top issues, their training and safety programs, the lessons…

  • Arizona Edition,  Flipbook

    Volume 13 Issue 3 March Arizona Edition

    By Kris Polly As Arizona irrigators know, the tier 1 cuts to Colorado River water deliveries are starting to bite. The drought on the Colorado is a deadly serious affair. This month, we are pleased to feature a column by United States Senator Mark Kelly, whose Colorado River Indian Tribes Water Resiliency Act would help free up more Colorado River water for irrigation.  We also look at the tier 1 cuts from the district perspective. This year, the Maricopa-Stanfield Irrigation and Drainage District (MSIDD), based outside Phoenix, will receive only about one-third of its previous water allocation. We talk with MSIDD Director of Water Operations Tony Solano about the district’s…

  • Arizona Edition,  Flipbook

    Volume 13 Issue 2 February Arizona Edition

    By Kris Polly Noel Carter, the general manager of Arizona’s Buckeye Water Conservation and Drainage District, has a family history in the Buckeye Valley that goes back to the 1890s. Today, the district he leads provides water and drainage services to local farmers and is helping them continue their success into the future by addressing challenges including alkali damage, urbanization, competing demands on local water, and fluctuating power prices. This year, Nebraska’s national resources districts (NRDs) are celebrating a half-century of achievements in soil and water conservation work with open houses, events, and more, as we learn in our cover interview with Dean Edson, the executive director of the Nebraska…

  • Arizona Edition,  Featured,  Interview

    Senator Jon Kyl on Arizona’s Response to Its Water Challenges, Past and Future

    During his more than 26 years in Congress and his time working as a lawyer in Arizona, Senator Jon Kyl was directly involved in groundwater management programs, surface water allocation settlements, and the development of a major water supply project, the Central Arizona Project (CAP). In this interview, Senator Kyl reflects on his accomplishments in Congress, Arizona’s response to the ongoing drought in the Colorado basin, and how Arizona can address the challenges of the future. 

  • Arizona Edition,  Flipbook

    Volume 13 Issue 1 January Arizona Edition

    By Kris Polly This month, we have the honor of featuring former Senator Jon Kyl of Arizona on our cover. Senator Kyl has long experience in groundwater management, surface water settlements, and the development of a major water supply project, the Central Arizona Project. In our interview, he brings this broad experience to bear on Arizona’s current and future water challenges.  In this issue, we also talk to a number of Nebraska water professionals. Nebraska-based water lawyer Tom Wilmoth is also a cofounder of Zipline Brewing, which has created 36 jobs with its brewery in Lincoln and retail locations in Lincoln and Omaha. Not only is making beer a way…

  • Arizona Edition,  Featured,  Interview

    Ed Gerak of the Irrigation and Electrical Districts Association: Advocating for Arizona’s Power and Water

    The Colorado basin has suffered from drought for two decades, and recent cuts to water allocation under the Drought Contingency Plan (DCP) will not just hurt Arizona farmers but cause steep increases in the cost of power generation. That’s just one of many issues of concern for the Irrigation and Electrical Districts Association (IEDA), a statewide association that advocates on behalf of Arizona’s public power and water providers. In this interview, IEDA Executive Director Ed Gerak talks about the current challenges facing its members. 

  • Arizona Edition,  Flipbook

    Volume 12 Issue 10 Nov/Dec Arizona Edition

    By Kris Polly As the tier 1 cuts under the Drought Contingency Plan start to bite, all Arizonans are aware of the reduction in water resources caused by the Colorado basin drought. However, the drought is not just cutting into agricultural and municipal water supplies, it is also reducing hydropower generation and causing steep increases in power costs. To learn more, we speak with Ed Gerak, the new executive director of the Irrigation and Electrical Districts Association. Then, in an interview with Arizona Department of Water Resources Director Tom Buschatzke, we hear about how Arizona is responding to the tier 1 cuts and planning to secure its future water supplies. …

  • Arizona Edition,  Flipbook

    Volume 12 Issue 9 October Arizona Edition

    By Kris Polly Bob Lynch passed away on August 29, 2021. He was an honorable family man who never said no to a friend in need. Bob was also the go-to western water and power attorney for countless people and multiple associations, and he was a tireless advocate for his clients. His absence on legislation and potential policy changes is already felt and will be for decades. For the better part of the 30 years during which I have been working on western water issues, the solution to many people’s problems has been, “Call Bob Lynch.” He was a constant presence and active participant in all federal western water- and powerrelated issues. In many ways, Bob was like the 101st United States…

  • Arizona Edition,  Featured,  Interview

    Tom Davis: Preserving and Strengthening Arizona’s Desert Ag

    The Yuma, Arizona, area produces the vast majority of North America’s winter produce, including leafy green vegetables, broccoli, cauliflower, kale, and celery. The Yuma area also produces high-quality desert durum wheat, citrus, melons, cotton, and a variety of seed crops. Most of the irrigable acreage in the area is double or triple cropped. This production relies on Colorado River water delivered by entities such as the Yuma County Water Users Association (YCWUA). The water interests of the agricultural community in the area are defended by the local irrigation districts’ boards of directors and by organizations such as the Yuma County Agriculture Water Coalition (YCAWC) and the Agribusiness and Water Council…

  • Arizona Edition,  Flipbook

    Volume 12 Issue 8 September Arizona Edition

    By Kris Polly The Yuma, Arizona, area is the nation’s top producer of winter produce, thanks largely to Colorado River water. Tom Davis, the general manager of the Yuma County Water Users Association and the president of the Agribusiness and Water Council of Arizona, tells us about the historical efforts that have made that possible and the challenges Arizona now faces with the drought on the Colorado and the depletion of nonrenewable groundwater.  We also bring you several stories from the nearby Imperial Valley of California, which is also a major winter crop producer. Henry Martinez, the general manager of the Imperial Irrigation District (IID), the top user of Colorado…